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Posts for: July, 2020

WhateverYourVacationPlansThisYearDontForgetTeethandGumCare

COVID-19 containment restrictions could put a kink in many of our vacation plans this summer. With leisure air travel discouraged and popular attractions like Disney closed, this may be the year for a “staycation.” But however your summer plans turn out, be sure you keep up with the essentials—like taking care of your teeth and gums.

Vacations, whether a road trip or a camping getaway in your own backyard, are times to recharge the “mental batteries” by temporarily leaving everyday life behind. But not everything—you still need to take care of life's necessities, including daily dental care. Not to sound like a schoolmarm, but there is no vacation from brushing and flossing.

Actually, it's not that onerous: Just five short minutes a day is all you need to effectively perform these two essential hygiene tasks before you head out for your vacation activities (or non-activities, as the case may be). During those five minutes, though, you'll be removing built-up dental plaque, a bacterial film that's the top cause for tooth decay and gum disease.

You should also keep an eye on your vacation diet. For many people, seasonal getaways often come with an increase in sweet treats like pastries, ice cream or, the perennial campfire favorite, s'mores. But increased sugar may also raise your risk for dental disease. So, limit those sweet treats, consider alternative snacks without sugar, and brush after eating to keep tooth decay or gum disease from getting a foothold.

An equally important measure for maintaining healthy teeth and gums is a regular dental visit at least twice a year. During these visits we'll clean your teeth of any missed plaque or tartar (hardened plaque) and check for any signs of dental disease. Our goal is to keep you in the best oral health for the long haul.

Everyone needs a break from the routine now and then, even if it's a creative alternative to the traditional summer trip. Just be sure you have your dental care covered before your vacation.

If you would like more information about daily and regular dental care, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Daily Oral Hygiene” and “The Bitter Truth About Sugar.”


By Catoctin Dental
July 20, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
AcidRefluxCouldLeadtoToothDamage

Your tooth enamel’s main nemesis is oral acid: normally produced by bacteria, foods or beverages, acid can dissolve enamel’s mineral content and cause erosion and decay. But acid might be a bigger problem for you if you also have gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD.

GERD is a digestive condition in which stomach acid backs up into the digestive tract. Normally, a ring of muscle at the end of the esophagus prevents stomach acid from coming up into it. But if it weakens, this powerful acid can splash up into the esophagus and irritate its more delicate lining and result in a burning sensation known as heartburn or acid indigestion.

The problem for teeth, though, is that GERD could cause stomach acid to potentially come up into the mouth. Because of its high acidic pH (2.0 or less), stomach acid can cause major erosion in tooth enamel, leaving them pitted, yellow and sensitive. If not caught and treated early, some of your teeth could be damaged to the point that they have a questionable prognosis.

There are some things you can do to minimize GERD’s effect on your dental health. First and foremost, see a doctor about managing your symptoms, which might include medication. Be sure you also inform your dentist that you have GERD and what medications you’re taking.

One way to lessen the effect of higher acid in the mouth is to stimulate saliva production, which helps neutralize acid. You can do this by drinking plenty of water, taking a saliva booster or chewing xylitol-sweetened gum. You can also rinse with plain water or water mixed with baking soda (1/2 teaspoon to a cup of water), or chew an antacid tablet to help balance your mouth’s pH level.

And don’t forget to look out for your enamel. Be sure you’re practicing daily brushing and flossing and using fluoride hygiene products to strengthen it. Your dentist can also apply topical solutions or prescribe special rinses with higher concentrations of fluoride.

GERD can be an unpleasant experience that escalates into major problems. Don’t let it compromise your dental health.

If you would like more information on managing oral health with acid reflux disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Catoctin Dental
July 10, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: loose tooth  
WeNeedtoActQuicklytoSaveYourLooseTooth

If you're an adult, your teeth shouldn't wiggle—not even a little bit. If you have a loose tooth, you need to see your dentist as soon as possible to avoid losing it permanently.

Loose teeth usually happen because of one of two kinds of bite-related trauma. One is known as primary occlusal, which usually happens when the periodontal (gum) structures that help secure teeth encounter higher than normal biting forces. This is usually due to a clenching or grinding habit.

The other and more common kind is secondary occlusal: This happens when the periodontal structures and supporting bone are in a weakened state, usually because of gum disease. In this condition, even normal biting forces can cause damage to a tooth's gum attachment and result in looseness.

To stop a loose tooth from becoming a lost tooth, we'll need to take these immediate steps.

Treat any underlying disease. If a gum infection is the culprit, our first priority is to stop it from doing any more damage. The main treatment for gum disease is to remove dental plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles that's the usual cause for the infection. Depending on how much the infection has advanced, this could take several sessions to bring it under control.

Reduce abnormal biting forces. If teeth are loose from abnormally high bite forces, there are a few things we can do. One is to selectively reshape the biting surfaces of teeth so that they receive less force while biting. Another approach is to minimize the effect of teeth grinding with an occlusal guard worn in the mouth: Its slick plastic surface prevents teeth from making solid contact while biting.

Splint loose teeth to secure them. We can secure loose teeth by splinting them to more stable teeth with metal strips or other means. Splinting is often done in conjunction with the aforementioned treatments, and is usually temporary until the tooth regains its periodontal attachments. Sometimes, though, it may be necessary to permanently splint a weakened tooth.

A loose tooth isn't necessarily destined to be lost. But we'll have to act quickly—if you have a loose tooth see us as soon as possible to determine how best to save it.

If you would like more information on saving loose teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treatment for Loose Teeth.”